Ukraine invasion — explainedThe roots of Russia's invasion of Ukraine go back decades and run deep. The current conflict is more than one country taking over another; it is — in the words of one U.S. official — a shift in "the world order."
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Ukraine invasion — explained

Russian troops arrive back in the Russian city of Ivanovo on Jan. 15 after serving briefly in the former Soviet republic of Kazakhstan. The Russian forces were dispatched to help Kazakhstan's President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev stamp out widespread protests against his authoritarian rule. Kazakhstan is just one of five former Soviet republic where Russian troops have been operating this year. AP hide caption

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AP

Ukraine is the focus, but Russian troops are in several ex-Soviet republics

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Ima hugs Shakira at a shelter provided by the Nigerians Diaspora Organization in Poland. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

They escaped the war in Ukraine. Then they faced fresh trouble in Poland

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Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban gives his an international press conference April 6, days after his FIDESZ party won the parliamentary election, in the Karmelita monastery housing the prime minister's office in Budapest. Attila Kisbenedek/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Attila Kisbenedek/AFP via Getty Images

One man stands between Europe and a ban on Russian oil: Hungary's Viktor Orban

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Father Oleksandr Yarmolchyk stands inside the demolished nave of his Orthodox church in Peremoha, Ukraine on April 17. He says the Russians bombed his church and held him against his will. Franco Ordoñez /NPR hide caption

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Franco Ordoñez /NPR

The complex effort to hold Vladimir Putin accountable for war crimes

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A monument for Taras Shevchenko is symbolically protected by bandages in Borodyanka, northwest of Kyiv. Nickolai Hammar/NPR hide caption

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Nickolai Hammar/NPR

This is what one town in Ukraine looks like after Russian troops withdrew

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International legal experts must decide how to formally describe Russia's actions in Bucha, Ukraine, where mass graves were found. Anastasia Vlasova/Getty Images hide caption

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Anastasia Vlasova/Getty Images

A couple walk in front of the Kremlin's Spasskaya Tower and St Basil's cathedral in downtown Moscow. While 80% of poll respondents say they support Russia's military, some have mixed feelings. Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images

What Russians think of the war in Ukraine, according to an independent pollster

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Kyiv Mayor Vitali Klitschko (right) and his brother Wladimir Klitschko check a phone at city hall on Feb. 27. When Russia invaded Ukraine, many expected Moscow to knock out the Ukrainian communications network. But Ukrainian systems, for both civilians and the military, continue to function. Ukraine, meanwhile, has regularly intercepted Russian military communications. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

How does Ukraine keep intercepting Russian military communications?

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Not all Russians agree with their government's military actions in Ukraine, but speaking out can come with major repercussions. Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images

Anastasia thinks about leaving Russia. Here's what her life looks like today

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Two farmers take a break from sowing their field with oat, east of Kyiv on April 16. GENYA SAVILOV/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GENYA SAVILOV/AFP via Getty Images

It's planting season in Ukraine, and that means problems for global food supply

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Nadiia Yerkhimovych, 89, at her apartment in Kyiv, Ukraine, on March 26. She's been bedridden during the Russian invasion that began in late February. From her home, she could hear the sounds of airstrikes and shelling. Carol Guzy hide caption

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Carol Guzy

They've spent a lifetime in Kyiv. Not everyone can flee Russia's war in Ukraine

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Left to right: Alexey Voloshinov, 20, Nastasya Dubovitskaya, 23, Leonid Kabanov, 30, and Lev Kalashnikov, 35, are all Russians who are living in Tbilisi, Georgia, after leaving their country in recent weeks. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Meet the Russians who are fleeing — not the war, but their own government

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Iryna Holoshchapova, a Ukrainian refugee who fled the embattled city of Mykolaiv, shows a video on her smartphone of an apartment block on fire following a Russian attack. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Russian Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin waits for the start of a court hearing in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Monday. Judges went on to sentence him to life in the first war crimes trial since Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

A Russian soldier is sentenced to life in prison in Ukraine's first war crimes trial

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Raise Grigorievna Dreama's daughters Malina (left) and Ramina (center) and her granddaughter Monica (right) sit in their room at a temporary Chisinau housing center for refugees, mostly hosting people from the Roma community and other minority groups from Ukraine, in April. Betsy Joles hide caption

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Betsy Joles